Elderflowers and pomegranates.

Well this first pic has absolutely nothing to do with pomegranates or elderflowers but I always get excited when I play with compost. We are starting to sort out the area down the west side of the house where the clothesline is and up until now I’ve had one of my 6 compost bins there. This needed to be moved to make way for a couple of garden beds for espaliers and so we can put toppings on the ground. This is the area I mean. The espaliered pear on the left is the one I planted in 2012 before we moved in. This is the thumbnail pic of way back then. So anyway, compost out of the way, now Mr ATMT could get busy building beds and shovelling crushed rock. Just about tamed this area now and the soil certainly smells a whole lot better than it did when we started out. It doesn’t look anywhere near as ‘nursing home’ as this in reality! Trust me.

This is the area when we purchased. No sunlight had touched the house for years and everything was mouldy, damp, smelly and even though it had that ‘old world charm’ feel to it it was pretty gross. We also had fencing installed between us and our immediate neighbour.

So on to elderflowers and pomegranates!

One of the first things I planted was what I had bought as an elderflower plant. The goal was to screen and offer protection from summer afternoon sun to the chook house and to create wonderful cordials and beverages. Sadly this plant has only reached one of these objectives. It has worked extremely well protecting the chook house but sadly not one berry to be had and the cordial I made from the (very pretty) flowers tasted of freshly chopped grass. Time to rethink me thinks.

I’ve started the cut back here so the winter sun can reach the chook house. This plant shoots back amazingly well.

This pic shows the floret remains where berries should form, or so I think. These are the very pretty flowers that adorn the bush prolifically but according to some lovely visitors we had at our food gardens open day, they didn’t have the right fragrance. They were quite experienced in elderflowers apparently so I’ve started to wonder if we actually have a legitimate variety. Further investigation to take place now as I love the idea of elderflower champagne.  I planted a little pomegranate bush near the doors of the greenhouse last season and it is just going nuts. I absolutely love everything about pomegranates, and will be beside myself if we actually get to harvest a homegrown one. The bush has been continually in flower for a  while so Ive been giving the flowers a tickle with a little paint brush between male and female flowers in the hope pollination will be more successful. Well, lookie here! I do believe we may actually have a baby pom in the making. I’ve found another 2 now so these are going to be watched closely to see what evolves. I have such fond memories of fresh pomegranate juice at all the roadside stalls throughout Turkey.

And a couple of tag alongs!

The coriander I have been drying to save seed from is now ready to be thrashed to separate the seeds. I always feel a little bit clever when something so easy takes place. I get better results growing it for seed than I do as a herb as it just seems to bolt quickly. The grapes in the berry house are turning in colour. These grapes taste of passionfruit and are absolutely delicious. Just need to make sure there are absolutely no little points of access for the birds who think they are delicious too. Then there is this! I planted some pumpkin seeds I had saved from a perfectly normal looking butternut pumpkin and this is whats growing. I’m going to let it continue and see what evolves, it may be something stunning. We’ll wait and see. So that’s the little catch up, if you have any knowledge about elderflowers varieties, pomegranates or dodgy looking pumpkin plants I’d love to hear from you.

About fergie51

Sourdough baker, teacher, eater and student. Sustainable living advocate and passionate food grower. Conduct sourdough baking classes at my home and administrator of Facebook support page for Australian & New Zealand sourdough bakers.
This entry was posted in Grapes, In The Garden, Renovation, Seed Raising & Propagation, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to Elderflowers and pomegranates.

  1. Six compost bins! I thought we were doing well to have 3 plus a patch. Interesting, our [neighbour’s] grapes are similar, and have been and gone. The G.O., satin birds and chooks enjoyed them very much. Same neighbour also has a pomegranate, ehci I’m also looking forward to fruiting.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. vanyadhanya says:

    It’s such a joy to watch plants and trees grow; your patch looks wonderful. I have started with herbs this season and slowly want to gain confidence and move to growing veggies and fruits too.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. foodnstuff says:

    I’m so glad you wrote this because I’ve been wondering about the elderberry plant you gave me. Was it a cutting from yours, because it’s behaving the same? Plenty of flowers, but no berries. I’ve been enviously reading other blogs showing elder bushes laden with berries and the tastiness of elderflower ‘champagne’. I think I won’t persist with mine, i.e. watering it, and will leave it to itself until I find out more about the various types and varieties. Let’s know if you find out anything.
    That area certainly looks better for its facelift….so satisfying when you do something like that.
    My 2 pomegranates have flowered for the past couple of years but no fruit yet.
    That’s a pumpkin? Martian variety perhaps? 😉

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  4. Glenda says:

    Wow every thing looks great Maree. Pomegranates are dead easy to grow. You will have hundreds before long. But beware of birds. The seeds freeze well.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. crumbs that mutant pumpkin looks like it might take over and devour you.:) i remember hugh fearnley whittingstall making elderflower champagne. sounds delightful. interesting about growing the coriander from seed. whenever i have planted out a little plant, it just bolts and that’s that. love your grapes! cheers S

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  6. Those pomegranates look like ornamental ones. They are small, but still edible. The big poms grow on small trees. Sherry’s suggestion of making elderflower champagne sounds great (and really tastes good). If not, then a simple elderflower cordial syrup (great mixed with a bit of lemon).

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