Logs into firewood, flour into bread. A weekend of conversions.

A couple of months ago I mentioned the gum tree from our front nature strip was removed by VicRoads and I managed to have the wood and mulch from it left with us. The mulch was a drop in the ocean to what we need but the quantity of logs was much more than I had anticipated. We have been looking at this pile of logs since we moved them to the backyard and this weekend was the weekend to split them. I hired a log splitter and Mr ATMT spent Saturday turning this,

Flowering gum wood

into this.

IMG_1143

The wood then had to be stacked away to let it dry, which in itself was a huge job. Well done Mr ATMT!   Don’t worry, I did contribute, not just observe. My job was to move all of the wood we had stacked against the back fence after we had trees removed when we took over the property. All the wood is now in one place, stacked, split and ready to be used however we choose. While splitting the wood we noticed a couple of the logs had fresh ‘blood sap’ in the core. This looks amazingly like blood and I could have been fooled if Mr ATMT had wanted to stir the pot and tell me he had injured himself. Quite bizarre seeing this, it is quite common in gum trees, apparently those that are not well.

Gum Tree blood sapI took advantage of the magnificent balmy winter day and planted a couple of hundred bulbs I had ordered from Garden Express. There was a variety of freesia, daffodils, ranunculus, anemone, iris and ixia. A couple I can’t remember too!

Garden Express

Now that the screen fence (the one made from old greenhouse shelves) is in place I was able to plant a range of plants that had come either from my sister or rom our Fish Creek property  before we sold. These included, geranium, native orchid (Dendrobium), violets, ferns  and Clivia. Of course the girls were on hand to help and supervise!

IMG_1154The bread I made this weekend was Ken Forkish’s ‘Pain de Compagne’ (Country bread). I’m really enjoying making a new bread every weekend and it is very interesting to see how the different bakers methods compare. This photo is of the dough going through what is called ‘bulk fermentation’. That is after is has been mixed and stretched and folded (form of kneading without kneading). I love watching the dough go through its changes until it is ready to shape and do a final proving before it is baked.  The black line on the bucket is where the dough started out when I put it in there.

IMG_1133

This loaf is a winner! Forkish doesn’t normally slash (score) his loaves, he places them in to cook with the seam up and they do a natural eruption at that point as it is a weak spot.   I however like to play with  razorblades!

Pain de Compagne ForkishSweet potato happiness.

Today was the day! I’ve been eager to see what sort of result, if any, I was going to get from the sweet potato I planted in the greenhouse. This was grown from a sprouting I did last year and I would not have been surprised if I had no success. But Look!

Sweet Potatoes Melbourne

2 Whole kilos of beautiful, mostly good sized tubers. I did a little happy dance at this result! The one at the front is going back in to the wicking bed along with some tip cuttings, it looks healthy and has some good roots so we’ll see. I can see a personal  challenge happening with these. What have you has success with growing that you didn’t expect to achieve?

 

 

This entry was posted in Bread, Flowers, In The Garden, Potatoes (Spuds), Recipes, sourdough, Sustainable Living, Uncategorized, Vegetables, Wicking Beds and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Logs into firewood, flour into bread. A weekend of conversions.

  1. Francesca says:

    Your bread looks so professional, I am hoping that you will do a post of that recipe one day. Great to see that wood stacked for next year. And the girls going about their work moving the mulch around. Love weekends like this.

    Like

    • fergie51 says:

      Thanks Francesca, like money in the bank when you have firewood stashed. Thanks about the bread, I hadn’t thought about the actual recipe just cited where I got the recipe I used from. I think my regular Tartine style loaves are consistent enough now so I might just consider posting a recipe. That’s a little scary though!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. mscate says:

    those potatoes look amazing!

    Like

  3. Glenda says:

    Oh Maree your sweet potatoes looks fabulous. I am definitely going to try to grow them. Good work with the wood and the bulbs and especially your bread.

    Like

  4. MamaD1xx4xy says:

    That loaf of bread is truly gorgeous! The potatoes look tasty as well.

    Like

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